Total Square Footage

To gure square footage you need to multiply height by width for your total area. The easiest way to do this is to break your area down into rectangles, nd the square footage of those smaller sections, and then add up all of the sections to find the total.
In the example above, the gray areas show where the stone siding will be installed and how it’s been broken down into smaller sections. After nding the square footage for each section you would add areas A, B, C, D, E, and F to find your total square footage.
Using a similar method, find your total square footage and enter it in the box.

Outside Corners

Measuring for the lineal footage of outside corners is as simple as measuring the height of corners where outside corner pieces are needed. In this example there is one outside corner marked in red. If you have more than one outside corner, you would need to measure each corner and add all the corner heights together to nd your total lineal footage.
Enter your total lineal footage of outside corners in the box.

Inside Corner Trim

Finding the lineal footage for inside corner trim pieces is the same process as outside corner pieces. If you have any inside corners (denoted here with a red line) on your project measure the heights and enter the total in the box.

Sill Pieces

Sill pieces are used under windows and as a visual break at the top of the stone as a transition to a different type of siding. In this example the plan is to end the stone at the bottom of the windows, so sill pieces are to be used in a straight line across the top of the stone on the house face (shown by the red line).
To gure the lineal footage of sill pieces needed for you project, measure the width of all places you plan to use sills and add those measurements together.
Enter your total lineal footage measurement in the box.

Starter Trip

Starter strip is a metal ashing that provides a solid, level base to start your installation. It is required at the bottom of where stone is to start.
As you can see in this example, since there is to be stone above the garage door there needs to be starter strip above the garage door to provide a base for the stone above the garage door.
To nd the lineal footage of starter strip needed, measure the width along the base of your installation (denoted here with a red line).
Enter the total lineal footage in the box.

Plastic Lath

Waypost Stone Siding has an integrated metal clip at the top of each piece that is used to hold the pieces to the wall, but certain installation situations do not allow for that clip to be used. In those situations a plastic lath is used as a latching surface so the pieces can be glued to the wall with construction adhesive.
In our example installation we have pointed three situations in which plastic lath would need to be used. Example A shows the stone going all the way to the so t. The last course of stone below the so t will need to have the clips cut o requiring plastic lath and glue. Example B is below the windows where you will also be unable to use the clip. Example C shows where we will be using outlet trim pieces. These pieces do not have clips and will need to be attached using plastic lath and glue no matter where they end up in your installation.
Identify places in your installation where you will require plastic lath and measure the lineal footage. In the case of electrical trim pieces, plastic lath is required on all four sides with the lath overlapping at the corners.
Enter your total lineal footage of plastic lath in the box.

Plastic Lath

Waypost Stone Siding has an integrated metal clip at the top of each piece that is used to hold the pieces to the wall, but certain installation situations do not allow for that clip to be used. In those situations a plastic lath is used as a latching surface so the pieces can be glued to the wall with construction adhesive.
In our example installation we have pointed three situations in which plastic lath would need to be used. Example A shows the stone going all the way to the so t. The last course of stone below the so t will need to have the clips cut o requiring plastic lath and glue. Example B is below the windows where you will also be unable to use the clip. Example C shows where we will be using outlet trim pieces. These pieces do not have clips and will need to be attached using plastic lath and glue no matter where they end up in your installation.
Identify places in your installation where you will require plastic lath and measure the lineal footage. In the case of electrical trim pieces, plastic lath is required on all four sides with the lath overlapping at the corners.
Enter your total lineal footage of plastic lath in the box.

Total Square Footage

To gure square footage you need to multiply height by width for your total area. The easiest way to do this is to break your area down into rectangles, nd the square footage of those smaller sections, and then add up all of the sections to find the total.
In the example above, the gray areas show where the stone siding will be installed and how it’s been broken down into smaller sections. After nding the square footage for each section you would add areas A, B, C, D, E, and F to find your total square footage.
Using a similar method, find your total square footage and enter it in the box.